Industrial Automation Companies

Build a Winning Team

Posted on August 10, 2021 by

Clayton & Mckervey

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The Sound of Automation

In this episode of The Sound of Automation, we sit down with Amy Lackie, Talent Acquisition Managing Partner of Diag Partners. Listen in to learn why adaptability, flexibility and culture are important factors for building a winning team in today’s changing environment. Bryan and Amy discuss how to expand the talent pool through candidate pipelines and encore careers.

Podcast Transcript

Announcer :

Welcome to the Sound of Automation brought to you by Clayton and McKervey. CPAs for growth-driven businesses.

Denise Asker, Director of Mkt. & Practice Growth:

Good morning, Bryan. Good to see you.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Denise, good to see you.

Denise Asker, Director of Mkt. & Practice Growth:

Yeah, I understand we’re talking about talent today.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

We are talent is the word of the day right now. I think as you look across the business community and our clients, everyone is struggling with this question. So we figured it probably a good time to have a session or a podcast on it.

Denise Asker, Director of Mkt. & Practice Growth:

Well, I’m glad you brought that up. In my day-to-day, I’m doing a lot with you all on talent. We’ve got some live videos on culture taking place throughout the year. We’ve got articles about talent and culture. We’re having a conversation today. Help our listeners with why a CPA firm would be so focused on talent and culture.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Yeah. While it may seem a little out of the norm or counterintuitive at first, you think about the role that the CPA plays for most of their clients is that role of trusted advisor. Right?

Denise Asker, Director of Mkt. & Practice Growth:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

We get to see so much behind the curtain that they don’t tend to open up with all of their advisors and their support community on. It’s just a logical point for us to be able to talk with them about. We really need to understand what’s going on in the market to be able to advise them. We get questions all the time, what are other system integrators, or what are other automation companies doing about this, about that? Since we’re numbers people, what should I be paying this role? If I want to expand down to Nashville, how much should I be paying somebody versus what I’m paying them here in Detroit? So we do end up getting a lot of questions in that area. And so it’s just something that we try to keep the pulse of understanding what’s happening so that we can make better recommendations to our clients.

Denise Asker, Director of Mkt. & Practice Growth:

Well, that makes sense. That sounds good. I know we’ve got some new service offerings in this area as well. So I’m going to sit back and look forward to your conversation with Diag today.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

All right. Thanks for coming in, Denise.

Denise Asker, Director of Mkt. & Practice Growth:

Thanks.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Bye. Hello and welcome to the Sound of Automation podcast. I’m your host, Brian Powrozek, and joining me today is Amy Lackie of Diag Partners. Amy, how are you doing today?

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Hi, I’m good. Thanks for having me.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Well, thanks for coming. So today’s topic, we’re going to talk a little bit about something that is always a challenge for most businesses, but I think is taking on even more and more important as the boomers start retiring and coming out of the pandemic and all this other stuff. So before we get into that, though, I guess, can you just give me a little bit of your background and tell me a little bit about Diag Partners?

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

I’m happy to, absolutely. So I’ve been in the staffing industry for about 10 years now. I started actually in logistics. I was a Recruiter for long-haul truck drivers. So that was my introduction to recruiting and I absolutely fell in love with it. And then I ended up changing a little bit, moving and working in New York for a small boutique staffing firm that specialized in digital hiring. So more corporate, that was really my first introduction to corporate hiring. And then I moved back to Michigan after about two years and I found Diag Partners.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

So Diag Partners is a global staffing firm. I like to call ourselves agnostic because there’s really no industry or one particular area that we really focus on. We work, our kind of bread and butter, is in the small to mid-sized businesses, but we also have some nice large enterprise companies underneath us as well.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Really our largest presence is here in the Metro Detroit area, but we have a pretty large office in Cleveland, Chicago. We have a presence in Los Angeles, Canada, as well as Europe. So I’ve been there for about, oh gosh, six years now. Started as a Recruiter, kind of worked my way up and now I’m one of their Managing Partners for their Talent Acquisition Division. And I also spearhead a department that we like to call our Shift Program. So essentially it’s our channel of referral partnerships. So many candidates who we’ve worked within the past, or who have been referred to maybe some of our clients, for example, we want to make sure that those candidates have very strong access and first access, if you will, to all of our roles that are uniquely Diag. So that’s been kind of a fun entrepreneurial division of Diag Partners, and it’s been a very successful program. So I’m excited to continue.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

And full disclosure, I mean, Clayton McKervey works with Diag, so we’ve got a long-standing relationship. And I know there’s a number of our clients that we’ve referred out to you.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

You guys have been keeping us busy.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

[crosstalk 00:04:50] Well, I think everybody’s staying busy this year.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

That’s very true.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

And we’ll get into that a little more in a bit, but kind of just to start things off here, I think when you’re out recruiting, everybody talks about their winning team and their winning culture. And I guess what from your perspective, does that really mean to a business when you’re trying to attract and bring in new talent?

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Absolutely. So you mentioned this earlier, but talent and hiring is just such a hot topic of conversation. It always has been, but this year in particular. I think building a winning team in today’s environment really has to incorporate a nice hybrid of skillset, but more importantly, culture. I think right now there’s kind of this weird thing happening where candidates are staying with the companies that treated them very well throughout the pandemic. So when you’re moving forward or looking for candidates who are very passively on the market, you have to attract them to a winning team as well and culture is really the big ticket. I know we’ve talked about culture for years, but it’s really making an impact in today’s job economy.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Yeah, and I think it gets even more challenging because those, as you mentioned, those sands are always shifting. For a while there, it was money. I know when I came out of college you could move a job every two to three years and get a huge raise. And then we were talking in preparing for this, then it started to shift more towards the culture focus, that you’ve got to have the right culture. And in a way, it’s really hard to nail that down because you could spend all this time building what candidates want now, and then a pandemic hits and now it’s going to be something completely different. It’s going to be flexibility and remote work. And there’s all the talk of the great, what’s the new buzzword now?

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Digital pivot.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Yeah, exactly. So many people are rethinking now, “Hey, is this really what I want to be doing? The pandemic gave me too much time to think.” So there’s going to be this wave of people potentially changing. You mentioned that you started out in logistics. I started out in engineering. I think a lot of people will be making those kinds of decisions. And so how does a business prepare for that, be ready for that as that comes down the line?

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

I think that’s a really interesting topic. I used this word in preparation, but I’ll probably use it a lot today, adaptability. And I think that is going to be the buzzword of 2021 as well as 2022. Figuring out what is going to be working best for us right now as an organization. You have to be adaptable, whether you can’t find the perfect candidate, maybe you are trying to think outside of the box, trying to find non-traditional employees, which I know we’ll talk about in a little bit later, but really being adaptable in today’s environment, I think is going to be huge for organizations, small and large. We’re kind of moving away from this traditional nine to five, you have to be in the office. I have to see you on the phones in order for me to know that you’re working. And you mentioned earlier companies have spent so much time building up their culture and in the course of 10 months, some of that culture went away.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

And how do you build that back up and how do you promote a digital culture and how do you promote something that is really exciting to work for, in a digital environment? I think that’s really interesting. But I do believe that organizations have to be creative thinking, adaptable, and honestly, patience. I think right now we’re used to, and you can appreciate this on the client end, I think we’re all used to clients needing everything yesterday. Now we’re kind of in this thinking mode of, okay, I understand it might take some while to find the perfect candidates. Which as a recruiting and staffing firm, we appreciate that from a timing standpoint, we’ll get the right candidate it just might take a little bit time.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Well, and it’s interesting, you mentioned that because I think at least everything I’ve read and I’m not, this is just something I touch on peripherally in my role, but it’s not my main focus, but the talent pool is shrinking. You’ve got the boomers coming out. You’ve got the next generation, the Millennials and Gen Z, coming in to fill that void. But you’re starting to see particularly with our clients in automation and in manufacturing, the skilled trades, some of those roles aren’t as prevalent, they’re not being as talked about in schools and focused on. So even though there’s, I think, the last time I checked there were about as many openings job openings as there were people on unemployment, but you don’t have that alignment in skills. Which I think goes back to your willingness to be flexible and adaptable and figure out how to adjust your business model, to suit what you have out there.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

And I think something that’s interesting that we haven’t seen and this is the first kind of job market shifts that we’ve seen in 11 years, but this one’s much different because it’s changing very often and very frequently and very quickly, honestly. So I think knowing kind of what the market looks like, what kind of candidates are out there. And for the first time in a long time organizations weren’t necessarily hiring for the last year. So they had the last 12 months to really think about their strategic hiring needs. Who’s going to be, we have a saying at Diag Partners, “Right butts, right seats.”

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

So to really be in that strategic mode to say, “Okay, we need five hires and these are it. We’re going to find the perfect candidates.” Going into that market to find, I’m going to use a cliche phrase here, but the purple squirrel that’s becoming more and more difficult. So again, going back to that flexible environment, you have to think creatively, if someone is hitting 8 out of the 10 checkboxes, you should talk to that person and have that conversation. Because you never know who you’re going to talk to. They might be your next culture improver and be the best employee on your team because of their work ethic, even though they’re missing maybe one or two skillsets.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

I mean, that was one of the concepts that I think, Jim Collins put forth in Good to Great, was that focus on finding good people and then find the role to get them into. And so some of that goes back to what you’re talking about is, it’s shifting from a space of, oh, I need a Controls Engineer, so I’m going to go out and I’m going to hire a Controls Engineer and I got this big candidate pool to draw from, and then I’ve hired the best one. And I go to saying, okay, I need these tasks completed. Or I need someone with the skills. And maybe part of their job is going to be Controls Engineer, but another part of their job is going to be something else that can we somehow find a way to fill all of our functional requirements, but with some different folks.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Exactly, you can teach new software, you can teach new technologies, you can’t teach personality and work ethic.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Yep.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

So that’s a big takeaway for companies right now in terms of hiring

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

That was one of the other things we talked about in preparing for this is, so how are you seeing companies adapt to this tightening labor market? And you’ve already kind of touched on the adaptability piece, but are there any things you’re seeing companies focus on right now?

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Absolutely. There’s a lot of different things that companies are getting creative for, in terms of hiring. I think one of the big players that a lot of people have been speaking about is the remote worker right now. For the last 45 years, we’ve focused on a 30-mile radius commute-wise. You can only find the talent that you’re looking in a 15 to 30-mile radius of Metro Detroit, let’s say, for example. Now you’re looking at a global scale. I think some organizations aren’t necessarily set up for hiring on a global scale, but let’s take national, for example. Your market went from 30 miles to the entire United States. So having that talent pool go from maybe 30 to 50 candidates to in the thousands really allows that organization to find the talent that they are looking for. If it is such as automations, everyone’s hiring automation controls right now.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

So I think having that opportunity and it’s definitely becoming more and more traditional to, let’s say not even on a national basis, but hey, can you look for this candidate within a 200-mile radius? They can work remote for the majority of the time, but if I need them to come in they can hop in a car and come to the office. So that’s kind of the trend that we’ve been seeing. And that, I think from a hiring standpoint, is going to open up the pool of candidates immensely.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

There’s also kind of this interesting idea of pipelining candidates. You spoke about the possibility of incoming and new talent. Where do we find that new talent and how do we get them trained up? There’s a lot of clients of ours that have learning labs that actually get maybe seniors in high school or seniors in college interested in manufacturing, engineer, technology. That way when they graduate, they have a position ready to go. I think a lot of organizations need to start thinking that way as well. Let’s line up our future talent and train them to be the talent that we need them to be in 20 years.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Yeah, and it’s interesting to me because as I’m talking with my clients, as I’m looking at this, the talent issue has been a problem as long as I’ve been in the workforce. Even, I mean, back in the nineties, when I started in engineering it was always hard to find good engineers. There were a lot of us, but it was hard to find good ones. And so it’s not like this is a brand new problem. It’s just people are now having to refocus how they’re going after it. And I found it interesting, I was speaking with a professor from Purdue the other week, and one of the things he mentioned is that manufacturing, whether you’re talking about the actual manufacturers or the supporting infrastructure, the integrators, the automation companies, has a PR problem.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Everybody thinks manufacturing, that kids coming out of college want to go work for Tesla, or they want to work for some app company in Silicon Valley. When in reality, the industrial automation industry is doing a lot of cool cutting-edge advanced work, but they just don’t know it. People think, oh, I don’t want to go work in a plant and deal with all that. So he’s like the companies have A- a PR problem that they’ve got to address. And so some of what you talked about there is getting out, showing students, even at the high school level, maybe, there’s always those, you see these reports come out from like ESPN or whatever of Duke offering this sophomore in high school a scholarship offer or something like that to come play for them. But that’s really what it’s getting to is, you’ve got to capture these kids’ attention so that they go into college thinking, oh, I want to go into automation, or I want to go into aerospace. It kind of shifts the time where businesses were spending it on, going to campuses and going to job fairs and just collecting resumes and talking to people to really now, hey, let’s get out earlier and start finding out where to find this talent.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

I agree. There’s also kind of this new idea of, I was at a seminar not too long ago, the encore career. So a lot of boomers who may be retired or stay-at-home mothers are a great example. Especially this last year, they had to stay at home and work two jobs to take care of their home, to teach their kids, what have you. And now they’re kind of back in this workforce and having that adaptability piece to say, “Hey, this person, maybe hasn’t worked in two to three years and maybe they don’t necessarily have the newest technology, but they have 30 years of experience. Let’s bring them on board.” I think the idea of thinking outside the box, companies are realizing that’s what they need to do.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Yeah. And this was something that Diag helped us with, as part of our practice one of our client services, is R&D tax credits, and I was the only engineer within the organization. And we found a gentleman like you were talking to Encore career. He works for us part-time now, he’s got some other stuff going on, but it fills a need. And now, it allows us to kind of step back and say, “Okay, well, where else could we potentially do that within our organization?” Traditionally Clayton McKervey focuses on CPA hires, find people that are on that CPA track, are there portions of the job that we could up-skill somebody to take over? Now that creates capacity with our more traditional hires to do higher-value consulting and advisory services for clients.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

And that brings up a good point, too, looking outside of your industry. I think a lot of organizations kind of default, well, we’re in automotive, or we’re in robotics, we need someone who has that background. That’s not always the case. So I think looking at correlating in parallel organizations and industries is something that companies can really do right now. And you’re going to have success with that as well. So I think kind of getting that tunnel vision of we need a person with 30 years of this experience and this software, that needs to kind of go out the window, in my opinion.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

No, exactly. Because you never know where that next opportunity could come from. And that’s a lot, what you talked about that the pipeline, that you do with your clients. So I guess how does Diag approach that with clients? Because really all of those whether it’s an encore career, it’s offering an internship to a high school senior, things like that, that’s all part of building that pipeline.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Exactly.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

When a client comes to you and says, “Hey, Amy, we’re ready to change,” how do you guys start that process?

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

So one of the parts I absolutely love about working for Diag and just Diag as a whole is that we are very much so consultative. We work with our partners. We have very strong relationships with our partners. We’re not necessarily throwing resumes and saying, “I hope it works.” We’re really diving into, okay, this is your engineering team. What do you need right now? What do you need in three months? What do you need in a year from now? Of course, we’re going to start with your priority. But when it comes to pipelining, that’s actually really where Shift comes into play. So I mentioned Shift as a kind of referral partnership program. So if you are referred by one of our clients, maybe a previous candidate. There’s also instances where we’ve worked with the candidate before, they went through the interview process, they’re absolute rock stars. They just didn’t get the job. We want to work with those candidates continually. We want to make sure that they have first access to our jobs.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

So a week from today, I’m working with a developer. I tell them, “Hey, we don’t have any developer positions available. I’ll let you know if one comes to attention,” a week goes by, I get a developer role. I’m reaching out to that candidate and maybe one other candidate that’s on my Shift pipeline, to make sure that they have access to our roles before we go recruit on Indeed or recruit on LinkedIn. So that’s kind of one portion of pipelining, but right now I think getting networked and getting really well connected with your pool of candidates is important, because when you call them back, even if it’s six months or a year from now, I have a good example on that, but they will answer your call.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

They will know who you are. If you are a Hiring Manager or Recruiter who is just kind of copying, pasting messages, and you’re really not getting to know your talent pool, that’s going to really be a deterrent for them moving forward. They want trust. And they want to know, something that I say for my Shift candidates is when you get an email from me, I want you to get excited because you want to read it, because it’s a job you’re going to get excited for. I try to do my absolute best of eliminating the emails of, I’ve been an engineer for 30 years, but my resume might just have two buzzwords of sales. And I get inundated with Indeed emails saying, “I have a $55,000 sales position. Are you interested?” Did you read my resume? Did you look at my background? I want to take that stigma away from staffing and recruiting. And I think that has a lot to do with pipelining. I would tell companies right now, again, to build relationships with your talent pool and make sure that you’re staying in contact because they will accept your next call or email, or what have you. They’re going to remember you if you do that.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Well, and it really sounds like something we talk about internally as we’re building our pipeline on the other side, the client pipeline, is sometimes extending that sales cycle. And that’s really what you’re talking about there, is that it gets you then, it helps establish that understanding of culture. That’s one of the things I always kind of laugh about when we’re out recruiting at a campus, that we’re talking about campuses and inevitably the students will ask, “Well, tell me about the culture?” I’m like, I can tell you about a color, but until you actually see it, you’re not going to be able to experience it and know it. And so as that process drags out and they start to see those touchpoints, they see, okay, yeah, this is different. This isn’t what I’m used to of just, oh, you’ve got an opening here. I’m going to slam you with 50 resumes and tell me which one you want to meet with. That’s the only way they’re really going to see that it’s kind of a different way of doing things. And in the end, you make sure you’re getting that right fit. As you said, the right butts, in the right seats.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Exactly. And you’re authentic about it and I think that makes a big difference. If you are authentically yourself, even as a Hiring Manager or Recruiter, you’re going to do much better with your talent pool. And they’re going to instill that trust in you versus again, a robot on the other end that is picking buzzwords off a resume and hoping that it sticks to the wall. We are really trying to break away from that. And we have been for the last six years.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

And hopefully, a year from now, things get back a little bit more to normal, but how have you found your clients trying to establish that authenticity in a remote environment where you’re interviewing? I interviewed somebody two weeks ago and it was, it was completely over our Zoom platform. And it was great. It was great seeing the person face to face, but it’s just not the same. So any recommendations for folks in that area?

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

I think the interview process is one thing. We’re all now very incorporated into Zoom, WebEx, RingCentral, if you will. So I think having as many team members involved as possible, maybe not necessarily a panel interview for your first round interview with a candidate, but I think incorporating your culture people into those interviews is very important. One of our clients actually does do a virtual tour, which is pretty cool for candidates to see. Like, “Hey, yeah, this is a virtual tour of our facilities and our lab and this is kind of a sense of our culture. You can see how the office is set up.” I think that’s a really interesting idea. I would also encourage video. I know a lot of, sometimes we default to just calls, but I would encourage a face-to-face video call, at the very least, to really instill this is who I am. I’m a real person, this is our culture. And who are you, as well?

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Yeah. I think that’s one of the nice things that’s come out of this experience of being forced to work remote and all this, there’s all those things that companies have meant to do or intended to do, but they just never got around to it. And so now if I’m a System Integrator in South Carolina and I found the perfect candidate, but he’s up in Montana, I need to have that culture defined, first need to know who we are as a company, who we’re looking for, what we want, and then package that in a way that they can understand that over Zoom and really develop those skills that if you find somebody locally, you don’t need to lean on that. But if you find the perfect candidate up in Montana and that’s where they want to stay, yeah, let’s make sure you got all these things in place. A lot of companies I’ve seen checking those things off the list of, Hey, we always meant to get around to doing this, and now here we are.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

And to be honest, I think companies might have to put a little bit more effort into engaging with their employees that are remote. So not necessarily just the interview process, but have a strong orientation, have a strong training program if that’s something that you do or need for the candidate rather. Do more check-ins often, have some one-to-one conversations. I know we got a little tired of the virtual happy hours for a while, but engage your team, engage on an individual basis as well as department basis or entire company basis. I think putting a little bit more effort, that way you don’t necessarily lose that culture piece in a digital environment is super important.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Yeah. I think one of the things that when we were talking about this, I mean, the one thing that’s here to stay is that the change is going to continue. It’s probably not going to be another pandemic, but it’s going to be something else that’s going to continue to force this change. And really in the technological circles, and I’m not an expert, but there’s the concept of Moore’s law that the processing power of a computer increases at this exponential rate, but really that’s kind of all aspects of our society. So everything that business owners are doing now is going to be outdated in the coming years. So what advice do you have for business owners in terms of setting up their business and their processes to be adaptable and to be able to adjust to those things as they come up?

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

I think learning what is important on the candidate’s end. Know what your market is, know what your team is looking for, know what your team is wanting, and being flexible from there and really understanding the needs of your team is going to help you be successful in this ever-changing environment. Because you are correct, what we’re instilling in organizations today, what might even change in the next six months, who knows? So I think staying vigilant on what your market looks like, your industry looks like, listening to podcasts, listening, getting involved in the community, not necessarily just your small bubble, I think is going to be really important. Talking to your peers, what are they doing? What are they doing differently? What has been successful for you? I think that’s a really strong strategic approach to being a strong hiring company in today’s market.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Yeah. I think that’s a great point that that often gets overlooked. We’re involved with a couple of different industry groups associated with automation, the Control System Integrators Association, but it’s really important to be involved in those things. Not just have it on your website that, Hey, we’re a member of CSI or a member of A3.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Get involved.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

But yeah, get involved. Talk to your peers, understand what they’re doing because one of my clients mentioned that their plan long-term is to stay remote. And he’s like, eventually, as I can get out of my long-term leases, I could bring the whole company together at a resort for a long weekend to get that morale team-building time. And even what I found in my own experiences, when I do go back into the office now, it’s much more focused on, okay, Hey, I’m going to meet with Denise to talk about this or meet with Tim to talk about that. And because you know you’re in the office for a specific period of time, specific purpose and then I’m going to be back home working. So yeah, just to be able to be flexible and adapt to those things, I think will help businesses going forward.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Yeah, absolutely.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Excellent. Well, Amy, I really appreciate you coming in today, and giving us this time, if anyone listening to this heard something that they want to follow up on, what’s the best way for them to get ahold of you?

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

So there’s a few ways. I am obviously on LinkedIn, I’m a Recruiter and a lot of my contact information is everywhere, Amy Lackie at Diag Partners, you can also go to diagpartners.com and for clients who need hiring, for candidates who are looking for a job, you can apply to our website and actually it comes directly to me. So I will reach out to you and start a conversation and kind of know the best path and how to navigate whatever you need from a hiring standpoint.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

That is the one thing I really do like about it, in my experience having referred a couple of clients, I think you guys take a very similar approach to us, that it’s not a eat what you kill type environment. So if it gets to you, if it gets to Joe, if it gets to whoever that you’ve been working with, they’ll make sure the candidate, the company, whoever it is, gets in the right hands to help solve those problems.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Correct. We’re a very macro thinking company and I love that. So whatever you need, we’ll figure it out and it might take a little bit of time or it might take one day, so we’ll figure it out and we’ll get it done.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Excellent. Well, Amy, thanks again.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Thank you.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Thanks for coming in.

Amy Lackie, Managing Partner, Diag Partners:

Yeah. Thanks for having me.

Bryan Powrozek, Sr. Mgr., Industrial Automation:

Thank you.

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The Sound of Automation Podcast

The Sound of Automation Podcast

Industrial automation businesses are the driving force behind Industry 4.0, and Clayton & McKervey is here to help.

Insights & Perspectives

The Sound of Automation: Looking ahead to CSIA 2022

In this episode we talk with Lisa Richter, Director of Industry Outreach and Growth at Control System Integrators Association (CSIA) . Lisa and Bryan look ahead to the CSIA Executive conference taking place in Denver, CO on June 27-30, 2022 and share with listeners what to expect, who will be there, and the discussion panel topics focusing on this years’ theme “The Future of Work”. 

Read More

The Sound of Automation Podcast

Industrial automation businesses are the driving force behind Industry 4.0, and Clayton & McKervey is here to help.

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